University

Niedersachsen Institutes of Technology (NTH)
Joining forces – experiencing cooperation

With around 23,000 students enrolled in Architecture, Mathematics, Computer Science, Natural Science
and Engineering at the three participating universities, NTH is one of the largest research and educational
institutions in the German academic landscape.
This alliance of universities is characterised by joint future-oriented key research areas, coordinated research
projects and cross-university collaboration in various research centres.
The President of Leibniz Universität Hannover, Professor Dr.-Ing. Erich Barke, assumed the Chair of the
NTH Board in 2013. According to NTH legislation, this position rotates between the member universities
every two years. The Board, NTH’s management body, consists of the three participating universities’ respective
president and two external board members.

For more information, visit
www.nth-online.org
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Innovative health technologies

What we offer

Research groups in Hannover have succeeded in their efforts to develop innovative health technologies in tissue engineering and cryopreservation. Bioethical and biolegal expertise was integrated in the research process from the very beginning, a unique characteristic ensuring the necessary social acceptance of the project and giving impetus to future legislation. One example of this is a variety of in vitro tests performed on the decellularised heart
valves of a REBIRTH project during ESPOIR clinical trials. Heart valve testing apparatus was developed and constructed for such purposes, the further development
of which has enabled tissue-engineered heart valves to be investigated. The comprehensive simulation of physiological conditions facilitates the early optimisation of artificial heart prostheses, circumventing future complications at the clinical trial stage.

Furthermore, cryopreservation is of great technological
interest for the long-term storage of cells and tissue. Due to the permanent availability of the body’s own cells, it will be possible in the future to cultivate tailored organs and tissue without the fear of rejection reactions. However, applications in stem cell therapy and reproductive biology technologies are often criticised.

Hence formidable ethical and legal questions arise in each field, such as: May a conventional heart valve be ‘destroyed’ in order to produce an experimental heart valve? How can an experimental study be conducted with groups requiring special protection, such as children? Is it acceptable to cryopreserve oocytes for lifestyle reasons?

The combination of scientific, ethical and legal issues results in a high degree of sustainability, creating a strong foundation for ensuring the success of innovative
developments.

What we are looking for

Research and industrial cooperations

Keywords

  • Ideas, proposals, partnerships for projects within research and intelligent energy programmes

Collaboration sought

  • Research & Development
  • Technical Co-operation

Responsible


Dipl.Ing.

Metallic and ceramic materials - Sustainable bioresorbable and permanent implants

What we offer

The core task carried out by researchers in this project is to develop medical implants for the well-being of patients, taking into consideration health economic aspects. The goal is to restore organ function by means of resorbable (dissolvable in the organism) and permanent implants. The materials have been optimally adjusted to the clinical application by optimising production and physical processing, and by applying coating.

Today, osteosynthetic implants (synthetic implants to deal with bone fractures and other injuries to the bone) are made of classic biocompatible materials such as cobalt-chrome and titanium alloys. Although the mechanical strength of these materials guarantees the stiffening of a fracture, many of these implants must be removed in a second operation after healing because the mechanical strength and elasticity of titanium is significantly higher than that of healthy bone. This leads to stress-shielding by the
implant and, subsequent, degradation of the bone. For this reason, scientists have conducted research into alternatives, and have developed new magnesium alloys and material systems that have the following advantages over conventional materials: the mechanical properties are similar to those of natural bone tissue; they are biodegradable and Magnesium play an important role in many metabolic reactions. Due to their biodegradability, there is a reduction in the stiffness of the materials over the treatment period, fostering the growth of natural tissue.
Degradation is initially analysed in vitro using technical
systems before being tested in vivo, i.e. in the living organism. At present, there are gaps in our knowledge of the factors that influence biodegradation, making it difficult to perform a convincing invitro corrosion analysis. In order to investigate these factors, researchers have developed the “Dynamic in-vitro Degradation Tester”. The degradation process is analysed by monitoring the magnesium ion
concentration during the tests, then validated using additional measuring methods such as EDX and mass lost determinatio.

The CRC 599 “Sustainable Bioresorbable and Permanent
Implants of Metallic and Ceramic Materials” is an interdisciplinary research association of the Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Stiftung Tierärztliche Hochschule Hannover, the Laser Zentrum Hannover, Technische Universität Braunschweig and the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research in Braunschweig.

What we are looking for

Research and industrial cooperstions.

Keywords

  • Ideas, proposals, partnerships for projects within research and intelligent energy programmes

Collaboration sought

  • Research & Development
  • Technical Co-operation
  • Joint Venture Agreement

Responsible

Dipl.Ing.

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